Well informed Farmers and Consumers are positive about GM Crops in Europe and Africa

Author Biographies

G. Gheysen

 Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University,

Belgium

 International Plant Biotechnology Outreach, VIB (Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie),

Belgium

J. Maes

Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University,

Belgium

Department of Educational Studies, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences,

Ghent University, Belgium

VIB (Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie), Belgium

M. Valcke

Department of Educational Studies, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences,

Ghent University, Belgium

E.I.R. Sanou

Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University,

Belgium

Department of Agricultural Economics, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent

University, Belgium

S. Speelman

Department of Agricultural Economics, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent

University, Belgium

Marc Heijde

International Plant Biotechnology Outreach, VIB (Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie),

Belgium

Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Ghent University, Belgium

Main Article Content

G. Gheysen

J. Maes

M. Valcke

E.I.R. Sanou

S. Speelman

Marc Heijde

Published Dec 19, 2019

Abstract




Genetically modified (GM) crops are cultivated globally on more than 185 million hectares, but the use of GM crops in Europe and Africa is very limited. Politicians are reluctant to allow such crops because they fear negative public reaction. The political hostility in the EU towards GM crops also has a significant impact on how African policy makers form their opinions for accepting GM crops in their own countries. However, studies reveal that specific types of GM food are welcomed by consumers and that few Europeans avoid GM labels when buying food. Similarly, African farmers and consumers are generally positive about GM crops. Policy makers should take these results into account when a decision needs to be made on whether or not to allow GM crop cultivation in their country.


KEY WORDS: ACCEPTANCE, AFRICA, CONSUMERS, EUROPE, FARMERS, GM CROPS





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