Teaching, social, and cognitive presences and their relations to students’ characteristics and academic performance in blended learning courses in a Tanzanian University

Author Biographies

Mustapha Almasi

  1.  Educational Sciences, Mzumbe University, Tanzania

  2.  Department of Educational Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

Chang Zhu

  1. Department of Educational Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

Haruni Machumu

  1.  Educational Sciences, Mzumbe University, Tanzania

  2.  Department of Educational Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

Main Article Content

Mustapha Almasi

Chang Zhu

Haruni Machumu

Published Aug 17, 2018

Abstract




This study examines teaching, social, and cognitive presences in relation to students’ academic performance in blended learning courses in a Tanzanian university. The study involved 353 stu- dents and examined several aspects of blended learning including face-to-face lectures, online and offline group assignments, online feedback, discussions, and online messaging via Moodle. A community of inquiry survey was used to measure students’ perceptions of teaching, social, and cognitive presences. Performance scores consisted of students’ coursework and final exami- nation grades. The results showed no statistically significant differences in the reported scores of teaching, cognitive, and social presences based on gender and age groups. Students with more advanced ICT skills reported higher teaching, social, and cognitive presences. Reported teaching presence was significantly different among the blended learning courses. Teaching, social, and cognitive presences showed a positive correlation with each other. The conclusion shows that although positively correlated, social and cognitive presences were not predictors of students’ performance; however, ICT skills were important in the studied courses.


Key words: teaching presence, social presence, cognitive presence, academic performance, blended learning





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